Profane Insult Goes Here

Jul 23 2014

(Source: memewhore)

196 notes

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clelta:

We were talking about Shakespeare in English class and the tradition of throwing tomatoes when the actors are bad. Well it turns out, back then people thought tomatoes were poisonous, and so people would aim at the actors mouth and try to kILL THEM WHEN THEY WERE BAD AT ACTING OMG

HI HAVE YOU MET THE ENGLISH?!

(via lipsandtits)

154,544 notes

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thesweetsubmissive:

thelesbianist:

floriculturism:

Mila Kunis and Zoe Saldana in After Sex (2008) [x]

(one of the hottest girl on girl scenes ever)

holy shit……………..

I neeeeeeed

Yoooo….

(Source: pizzarollgoddess, via lefi17)

115,816 notes

Jul 22 2014
nevver:

The opposite of lost, Nathaniel Russel

nevver:

The opposite of lost, Nathaniel Russel

2,238 notes

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goodstuffhappenedtoday:

Sixth-Grader’s Science Fair Finding Shocks Ecologists

When 12-year-old Lauren Arrington heard about her sixth-grade science project, she knew she wanted to study lionfish. Growing up in Jupiter, Fla., she saw them in the ocean while snorkeling and fishing with her dad.
Her project showed that the lionfish can survive in nearly fresh water. The results blew away professional ecologists. The invasive species has no predators on the Florida coast, so if they were to migrate upstream in rivers, they could pose a threat to the ecosystem.
"Scientists were doing plenty of tests on them, but they just always assumed they were in the ocean," Lauren, now 13, tells NPR’s Kelly McEvers. "So I was like, ‘Well, hey guys, what about the river?’ "In the beginning, she wanted to conduct her test by placing the lionfish in cages at different points in the river, but she had to simplify the project.
"It was just a small, sixth-grade project, and I really didn’t have all the tools necessary," she says. Her dad, who has a Ph.D. in fish ecology, suggested that she put the fish in tanks instead.
Lauren then put six different lionfish in six different tanks where she could watch her subjects closely. Lauren was given a strict set of rules by the science fair organizers. The most important one: Her fish could not die.
Lionfish had been found to live in water with salt levels of 20 parts per thousand. But no one knew that they could live in water salinity below that.
One of the six lionfish was her control fish, and the rest were the experimental fish. Every night for eight days, she would lower the salinity 5 parts per thousand in the experimental tanks. On the eighth day of her experiment, she found her experimental fish were living at 6 parts per thousand. She was amazed.
Her research did not stop there. Craig Layman, an ecology professor at North Carolina State University, confirmed Lauren’s results. “He credited a sixth-grader for coming up with his idea,” Lauren says ecstatically. Layman’s findings were published this year in the science journal Environmental Biology of Fishes. Lauren is mentioned in the acknowledgments.
Lauren’s father says he talks about science with her a lot. “We’re a science bunch of dorks in our family,” he tells McEvers.

goodstuffhappenedtoday:

Sixth-Grader’s Science Fair Finding Shocks Ecologists

When 12-year-old Lauren Arrington heard about her sixth-grade science project, she knew she wanted to study lionfish. Growing up in Jupiter, Fla., she saw them in the ocean while snorkeling and fishing with her dad.

Her project showed that the lionfish can survive in nearly fresh water. The results blew away professional ecologists. The invasive species has no predators on the Florida coast, so if they were to migrate upstream in rivers, they could pose a threat to the ecosystem.

"Scientists were doing plenty of tests on them, but they just always assumed they were in the ocean," Lauren, now 13, tells NPR’s Kelly McEvers. "So I was like, ‘Well, hey guys, what about the river?’ "

In the beginning, she wanted to conduct her test by placing the lionfish in cages at different points in the river, but she had to simplify the project.

"It was just a small, sixth-grade project, and I really didn’t have all the tools necessary," she says. Her dad, who has a Ph.D. in fish ecology, suggested that she put the fish in tanks instead.

Lauren then put six different lionfish in six different tanks where she could watch her subjects closely. Lauren was given a strict set of rules by the science fair organizers. The most important one: Her fish could not die.

Lionfish had been found to live in water with salt levels of 20 parts per thousand. But no one knew that they could live in water salinity below that.

One of the six lionfish was her control fish, and the rest were the experimental fish. Every night for eight days, she would lower the salinity 5 parts per thousand in the experimental tanks. On the eighth day of her experiment, she found her experimental fish were living at 6 parts per thousand. She was amazed.

Her research did not stop there. Craig Layman, an ecology professor at North Carolina State University, confirmed Lauren’s results. “He credited a sixth-grader for coming up with his idea,” Lauren says ecstatically. Layman’s findings were published this year in the science journal Environmental Biology of Fishes. Lauren is mentioned in the acknowledgments.

Lauren’s father says he talks about science with her a lot. “We’re a science bunch of dorks in our family,” he tells McEvers.

(Source: NPR)

734 notes

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tastefullyoffensive:

Video game store makes the most of their broken shutters. [x]

tastefullyoffensive:

Video game store makes the most of their broken shutters. [x]

(via krazykitsune)

57,170 notes

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Here’s to strong women. May we know them. May we be them. May we raise them.
— Unknown (via makelvenotwar)

(Source: quotable-notable, via realizethestrength)

97,460 notes

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Anonymous said: If you sell your body and have sex with complete random strangers, why the hell do you deserve respect? You don't respect yourself enough to not have sex with everyone. Why should I respect you and your work?

ryden-gg:

oh magic conch shell, what is wrong with a woman having sex with as many partners as she wants?

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oh magic conch shell, what is wrong with a woman wanting to receive money in exchange for sex?

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oh magic conch shell, could it maybe be that this bitch ass anon is threatened by women doing what they want with their bodies instead of what society has conditioned them to do?

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THE MAGIC CONCH SHELL HAS SPOKEN

image

4,489 notes

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rogha:

o-my-boys:

#OH MY GOD#THEY SKIPPED SCHOOL#TO AUDITION FOR THE FILM#NO FUCKING WONDER THEY GOT THE PART#THAT IS LITERALLY SOMETHING#FRED AND GEORGE WOULD HIGH FIVE OVER

No, but my favourite thing is that they showed up and all the other twins had matching outfits so they left and went across the road and bought matching shirts and wore them for the entire audition process.

rogha:

o-my-boys:

No, but my favourite thing is that they showed up and all the other twins had matching outfits so they left and went across the road and bought matching shirts and wore them for the entire audition process.

(Source: waltandmickey, via krazykitsune)

86,949 notes

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